April is Testicular Cancer Awareness Month

EINPRESSWIRE Press Release

Men’s Health Network

WASHINGTON, DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, UNITED STATES, April 1, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ —
CONTACT: Brandon Ross
communications@menshealthnetwork.org
(202) 543-6461 ext. 101

April is Testicular Cancer Awareness Month

Men’s Health Network (MHN) is joining with other health organizations to recognize April as Testicular Cancer Awareness Month, with a common goal of raising awareness amongst men, boys, healthcare providers, and communities across the globe.

Although testicular cancer is relatively rare, it’s the most common form of cancer in young men ages 15-35. This year, more than 9.400 new cases will be diagnosed in the United States, and more than 400 will die, according to the American Cancer Society.

The good news is that if testicular cancer is caught early, the survival rate is 95%. That’s why MHN encourages all young men ages 15-35 to perform testicular self-exams on a regular basis, and if they feel a lump or bump, to head to a doctor immediately.

“Young men need to be aware that they are not invincible, and cancer is not ‘an old person’s disease,’” said Ana Fadich-Tomsic, MPH, CHES, Vice President of Men’s Health Network. “Testicular cancer affects young men, and if caught early, is curable. We recommend parents talk to their sons about the importance of annual check-ups and testicular self-exams. If you notice a lump/bump that wasn’t there before, make an appointment to see your healthcare provider and get it checked.”

As with other diagnoses, it’s unclear where (or how) the COVID-19 pandemic will affect testicular cancer, but delaying a visit to the doctor once you feel a lump or bump because you’re afraid of going to a doctor’s office can put you at greater risk of cancer spreading beyond the testicles.

“I would still encourage individuals with concerns to go in and take proper precautions,” said Dr. David Gremilion, a member of the MHN Board of Directors and retired professor at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. “We know that social distancing, masking, and hand hygiene, works. So, I would encourage anyone who is in a high-risk group or have a lump in the testis should definitely go in and get checked.”

Alongside a coalition of partners and participants, MHN will be bringing the conversation to a mass audience as we will be hosting a Twitter Chat on Wednesday, April 21 at 2 p.m. EST to promote testicular cancer awareness.

Testicular Cancer Awareness Month is a great time for young men to start doing genital self-exams, but don’t stop there. Do those exams every month. For more information on testicular cancer and other men’s health issues, please visit www.testicularcancerawarenessmonth.com and www.getitchecked.com.

Men’s Health Network

Men’s Health Network (MHN) is an international non-profit organization whose mission is to reach men, boys, and their families where they live, work, play, and pray with health awareness messages and tools, screening programs, educational materials, advocacy opportunities, and patient navigation. Learn more about MHN at www.MensHealthNetwork.org and follow them on Twitter @MensHlthNetwork and Facebook at www.facebook.com/menshealthnetwork. Consider donating to MHN at www.menshealthnetwork.org/donate.

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Brandon Ross
Men’s Health Network
communications@menshealthnetwork.org