COVID-19 Has Families Talking About Their Wishes for Their Estate

EINPRESSWIRE Press Release
Female Founders  of Trustate

Tara Faquir, COO & Leah Del Percio, CEO

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Now is the time for families to sit down and share their wishes for their estates once they have passed on.

We help executors navigate the complex and stressful process of settling the estate of a loved one, regardless of circumstance.”

— Trustate

UNITED STATES, March 31, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ — In the last 12 months, more and more families have made time to clean closets, covert old video tapes to digital format and organize “their papers.”

“We have seen families disagree and experience frustration around what they believe their loved one wanted for their estate and having everything in order ahead of time, allows families to grieve without the stress of not having clear direction,” said Trustate Co-founder & COO Tara Faquir. “The key is to be prepared and have systems in place to make the process more efficient.”

Here are three things you can do to help your family avoid frustrations:
1. Call a meeting – Individuals can avoid frustration by speaking up and sharing their wishes and details outlined in their Will, particularly with beneficiaries and those making health decisions on their behalf. It is helpful for your beneficiaries to hear from you directly as you structure your estate, and if it is a more complicated estate, then having your lawyer participate is a good idea.
2. Communicate clearly – Let your friends and family know ahead of time how you want your estate structured. If you have made decisions about how to treat your family and friends, letting them while you are still with them, provides an opportunity for them to process the information. Note that this could open the door for them to try to convince you to make changes, resulting in an uncomfortable situation or worse, lasting family feuds. That is why communicating clearly is key to the family understanding your wishes.
3. Leave a note, letter, or a video – If you are not able to speak directly with your beneficiaries, family members and friends, then leaving a letter or video intended for the beneficiaries and family members to explain why you designed the estate plan a certain way is very helpful. The topic of your passing can be unpleasant for everyone and some family members would prefer to avoid it all together, but it is easier to accept when they read or see you sharing your wishes. At Trustate we strongly urge you to consult with an attorney before preparing something like that, as such writings, videos, and voice recordings are admissible as evidence (including any rough drafts, or deleted outtakes).

“If you believe your estate plan can cause drama among family members, we recommend you consult with an experienced estate attorney to coordinate an ‘all hands-on deck’ family meeting, with witnesses and that attorney present, to discuss your estate plan and set expectations. This way, everyone could hear the same information, at the same time, in front of objective observers. By choosing to share your estate plan now, you can get those discussions out of the way and keep everyone on the same page, whether they like it or not,” said Leah Del Percio, Founder and CEO of Trustate

Communicating ahead of time can bring relief and clarity to a family as they work through a very emotional process after a loved one has passed. Trustate is a unique estate administration concierges service that helps families deal with a loved one’s estate once they have passed on and allows the family to grief without the stress of the day-to-day administrative tasks of closing an estate. Trustate is where human empathy and technology meet. They are not a traditional technology firm, as their technology enables their estate concierges to complete estate-focused tasks less expensively if they were done manually.

Both Leah Del Percio and Tara Faquir are available for interviews on the topic of general estate supports and full estate administration services, once a loved one has passed.

Veronica V. Sopher
+1 512-694-6853
veronica@veronicavsopher.com
Visibility Strategist