Sanofi starts discussions on diagnosing, treating Type 2 inflammation in the ‘Greater Gulf Type 2 Inflammation Summit’

EINPRESSWIRE Press Release

Dr. Issam Hamadah, Consultant of Dermatology at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center

Dr. Majdi Idrees, Adjunct Professor of Pulmonary Medicine at the University of British Colombia

Dr. Rand Arnaout, Consultant and Section Head Allergy and Immunology at King Faisal Specialist Hospital

H.E. Dr Hussain Al Rand, Consultant ENT Physician and President of GCC and Emirates ORL Head and Neck and IFOS Regional Secretary for the Middle East and Gulf region

JEDDAH, SAUDI ARABIA, March 28, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ —

• World’s experts gathered together in a two-day event to present new local and global guidelines and lead the discussion on treatment protocols

• Type 2 inflammation, when it goes into overdrive, can contribute to the debilitating itch of atopic dermatitis, unpredictable and sometimes life-threatening asthma attacks, and the loss of smell and taste associated with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps [1]

• People with inadequately controlled moderate-to-severe type 2 inflammatory diseases commonly experience frequent and debilitating sleep disturbances and mental health [1][2]

As part of its staunch commitment to improve the condition and outcomes for patients in the region, Sanofi has led and facilitated a faculty of 15 of the world’s experts in the 2nd Annual ‘Greater Gulf Type 2 Inflammation Summit’, which discussed new updates on treatment protocols and presented new local and global guidelines in diagnosing and treating the disease.

The CME (Continuing Medical Education)-accredited two-day summit was held in a live broadcast and attended by more than 520 healthcare practitioners across the region.

Type 2 inflammation is part of a normal immune response to allergens and infections. However, when it goes into overdrive, it can contribute to the debilitating itch of atopic dermatitis, unpredictable and sometimes life-threatening asthma attacks, and the loss of smell and taste associated with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps [1].

Type 2 inflammatory diseases can affect both physical and mental health, with the severity of disease increasing when diseases are coexisting. People with inadequately controlled, moderate-to-severe type 2 inflammatory diseases commonly experience frequent and debilitating sleep disturbances and mental health [1][2].

Studies show that:

• About 46% of adolescents with atopic dermatitis (AD) have their school life negatively impacted by AD flares [1]
• Up to 50% of people with severe asthma report symptoms of depression [3]
• More than 90% of people with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis (CRSwNP) report sleep quality loss [4]

Dr. Issam Hamadah, Consultant of Dermatology at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, tackled atopic dermatitis or commonly known as eczema, which is among the most pervasive Type 2 inflammatory diseases that is characterised by skin lesions and itching.

According to a study published in the American Journal of Managed Care in 2019, this chronic skin disease affects 15 to 20 per cent of children and 1 to 3 per cent of adults worldwide [5]. It said: “Unchecked atopic dermatitis can have a physical, emotional and psychosocial impact, causing sleep disturbance, symptoms of anxiety and depression, and feelings of isolation.”

Meanwhile, Dr Majdi Idrees, Adjunct Professor of Pulmonary Medicine at the University of British Colombia, focused on Type 2 asthma, which affects over 300 million individuals worldwide [6]. Patients with this condition suffer from shortness of breath, wheeze, chest tightness and cough.

“Patients suffering from severe asthma often experience unpredictable exacerbations or severe flare-ups. Beyond physical symptoms, however, they also face a significant financial burden, not only for medical, but also through lost earnings and career choices,” he said.

On another note, Atopic disorders most commonly affect the nose, eyes, skin, and lungs. These disorders include conjunctivitis, extrinsic atopic dermatitis (the most common type of eczema), immune-mediated urticaria, immune-mediated angioedema, acute latex allergy, some allergic lung disorders, allergic rhinitis, and allergic reactions to venomous stings [7].

Dr. Rand Arnaout, Consultant and Section Head Allergy and Immunology at King Faisal Specialist Hospital in KSA, explained that atopic diseases pose as a growing burden for public health, affecting millions of patients worldwide, with the greatest impact on children and young adults. Often, multiple atopic conditions coexist in affected patients, which suggests that an integrated approach to diagnosis and treatment may be beneficial for both patients and healthcare practitioners [7].

H.E. Dr Hussain Al Rand, Consultant ENT Physician and President of GCC and Emirates ORL Head and Neck and IFOS Regional Secretary for the Middle East and Gulf region, stated that the exact cause of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is unknown but a biopsy of nasal polyp tissue shows an elevated allergic type of cells known as eosinophils. Typically, nasal polyps develop in adulthood in the 30s or 40s.

“CRSwNP symptoms may increase the risk of poor sleep, with snoring and shortness of breath, and changes in mood, including fatigue and sadness. They may also affect productivity at work and activity during the day, as well as the ability to enjoy food and detect fire or smoke,” he said [7].

Extending his gratitude for the experts in enhancing the discourse on type 2 inflammation, Jean-Paul Scheuer, Greater Gulf MCO Lead and General Manager for Sanofi Genzyme, said: “We truly appreciate the utmost efforts of the experts and esteemed speakers in taking part in this momentous occasion. They have been vital in leading the discussion on new local and global guidelines and lead the treatment protocols that helped enhance the knowledge of healthcare professionals and in turn, improve patient care.”

Resources:
[1] T. Zuberbier , S. Orlow and A. Paller, “Patient perspectives on the management of atopic dermatitis,” Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 118, no. 1, pp. 226-232, 2006.
[2] Price D, Fletcher M, van der Molen T. Asthma control and management in 8,000 European patients: the REcognise Asthma and LInk to Symptoms and Experience (REALISE) survey. NPJ Prim Care Respir Med 2014;24:14009.
[3] C. Rand, R. Wright and M. Cabana, “Mediators of asthma outcomes,” J Allergy Clin Immunol, vol. 129, no. 301, pp. 136-141, 2012
[4] L. Rudmik and Z. Soler, “Medical Therapies for Adult Chronic Sinusitis: A Systematic Review,” JAMA Dermatology, vol. 314, no. 9, pp. 926-939, 2015.
[5] Carmela Avena-Woods, BS Pharm, PharmD, BCGP
Supplements and Featured Publications, Atopic Dermatitis: Focusing on the Patient Care Strategy in the Managed Care Setting, Volume 23, Issue 8
[6] Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 328 diseases and injuries for 195 countries, 1990–2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016. Lancet 2017; 390: 1211–59.
Global Health Estimates 2016: Deaths by Cause, Age, Sex, by Country and by Region, 2000-2016. Geneva, World Health Organization; 2018. Global Health Estimates 2016: Disease burden by Cause, Age, Sex, by Country and by Region, 2000-2016. Geneva, World Health Organization; 2018.
[7] Gandhi NA, Bennett BL, Graham NM, et al. Targeting key proximal drivers of type 2 inflammation in disease. Nature reviews. Drug Discovery. 2016 Jan;15(1):35-50. DOI: 10.1038/nrd4624
Gandhi NA, Pirozzi G, Graham NMH. Commonality of the IL-4/IL-13 pathway in atopic diseases. Expert Review of Clinical Immunology. 2017 May;13(5):425-437. DOI: 10.1080/1744666x.2017.1298443. Nair MG, Guild KJ, Artis D. Novel effector molecules in type 2 inflammation: lessons drawn from helminth infection and allergy. Journal of Immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950). 2006 Aug;177(3):1393-1399. DOI: 10.4049/jimmunol.177.3.1393. Webb LM, Tait Wojno ED. Notch Signaling Orchestrates Helminth-Induced Type 2 Inflammation. Trends in Immunology. 2019 Jun;40(6):538-552. DOI: 10.1016/j.it.2019.04.003

Vince Ang
New Perspective Media Group
+971 55 473 9253
email us here